How to Raise an Indoor Pet Chicken

indoor chicken

Have you ever thought about raising an indoor pet chicken? This idea could have crossed your mind because you don’t have a lawn or because you simply want to be closer to your chicken. Whatever the reason, raising an indoor pet chicken is possible and fun.

Many people cringe at the idea of raising a chicken right inside the house. Of course, indoor chickens aren’t like our typical pets such as dogs and cats, but who says they can’t be indoor pets too? Here’s all you need to know about raising an indoor pet chicken.

An Indoor Pet Chicken

Chickens are generally outdoor birds. They need lots of space to run around, and they love to forage. However, they can also enjoy staying indoors. Having a chicken living with you inside the house might seem like a whole lot of trouble, but if done the right way, raising an indoor chicken can be fun and rewarding.

The great thing about chickens is that, contrary to what most people think, they can adapt quickly to your lifestyle. In no time, cuddling with you on the sofa and watching television will become second nature to them. This bondingcan go on while they continue to produce fresh eggs for you.

We got into the act of raising an indoor chicken by accident. It all started when our chicken fell sick and needed extreme care. There was no way we could give her the attention she required without bringing her inside the house. We brought her in, and before we knew it, she became a part of the family.

In a matter of weeks, she knew her way around the house and would run straight to the living room whenever the TV came on. It became such an enjoyable experience that when she got better, we couldn’t bring ourselves to send her back outside.

Things to Consider Before Deciding on Raising an Indoor Pet Chicken

indoor chickens

While the idea of raising an indoor pet chicken might be thrilling to you, there are a few things you must consider before deciding to raise one:

1. Chickens Create Dander and Dust

Chickens don’t have fur, but many people are allergic to the dust and dander that they produce. Before raising a chicken inside your house, you must be sure that nobody in your family is allergic to chicken dust and dander. If anybody in your home is in the slightest bit allergic, you must find a place for your pet chicken outside.

2. It Takes a Lifetime Commitment

Are you ready to take care of the chicken indoors for her life? As mentioned earlier, a chicken finds it easy to adapt to your lifestyle, and if allowed to stay inside for a while, it would get used to that lifestyle and also bond with you. Afterward, it would be harsh to send it back into the cold coop after a long time of cozy living and bonding.

When you decide to raise an indoor pet chicken, you have to be prepared to do so for the chicken’s lifetime. A typical chicken lives for an average of ten years. That’s a long-term commitment, and you must consider this before making your decision.

3. Are Pets Allowed in Your Apartment?

If you’re living in a rented apartment, you have to check in with the landlord to know if you’re allowed to bring in pets. If pets aren’t allowed inside, there’s a high likelihood that chickens wouldn’t be welcome too.

4. Other Pets in the House

If you already have a cat or dog in the house, bringing in a chicken might be a bad idea. The dog or cat could scare, and even harm your indoor pet chicken.

How to Raise an Indoor Pet Chicken

indoor pet chicken

Now that you’ve checked all the boxes, let’s get right into how to raise an indoor pet chicken. Here is a step-by-step guide to help you navigate the entire process:

Choose the Right Indoor Pet Chicken

In choosing the right indoor pet chicken, you’ll want totake size and temperament into consideration. I prefer a hen to a rooster because the former is less excitable and gives fewer problems compared to the latter.

Besides size and temperament, the breed of the chicken also matters. It’s more convenient to raise some chicken breeds compared to others. For instance, the Silkie chicken is a friendly, quirky chicken that tops my list of the best chicken breeds to raise indoors.

She has lovely feathers that lack barbicels, making her fluffy in appearance. Also, the chicken has a silky plumage, and if you have kids, they’d love her.

The Sultan Chicken is another chicken breed you can consider raising indoors. It’s an ornamental bird, with a puffy crest and long tail. This chicken is elegant and non-aggressive, making her very easy to handle.

There are tons of other chicken breeds to choose from, and the following also make my list of the best indoor pet chickens: Cochin chicken, Barbu D’Uccles, and Polish chicken.

Prepare Where the Chicken Will Stay

You have to decide if the chicken would have full access to all areas in your house or of it would be restricted to specific areas in your home. Limiting the movement of the chicken in your house is not a bad idea; some people leave only the ground floor or some other area open for the chicken. You also wouldn’t want your chicken to have access to your children’s rooms or other areas where the chicken might walk into harm.

Also, you need to get an indoor chicken cage or coop so your chicken can play around it without supervision. In doing this, you want to provide the most natural environment for the chicken as much as you can. This practice would mean adding things such as some sawdust and straws.

The cage’s floor should have a substrate to help cushion the chicken’s body. Straw is the best substrate to use for the chicken’s bedding as it provides warmth and a healthy germ balance. The cage should also have enough room to allow the chicken to eat, move about, and sleep.

Chickens love to take dust baths, and this will always create a mess around their cage area. So, consider keeping the cage away from the kitchen and bedrooms. The areas around the cage should also be easy to clean, and I suggest you use linoleum flooring around the cage.

For proper hygiene, clean the chicken cage regularly. I recommend doing so at least three times a week.

Make Arrangements for the Chicken’s Poop

indoor chicken coop

Getting a ‘poop plan’ is probably the most crucial step you have to take. Many people who find the thought of raising a chicken indoors bizarre do so because they simply can’t imagine the chicken’s poop in their living room.

If you don’t get the poop arrangement right, you’ll be forced to send your chicken out sooner than you’d expected. Some chicken breeds give out waste more than others, so it’s essential to have this in mind when choosing a chicken.

Here are the best techniques I use:

1. Chicken Diapers

Yes, I know that sounds awkward, but there are chicken diapers. Just like the usual baby diapers, they help the chicken pet move about the house without you worrying about them messing up the whole place. Before getting diapers, ensure your chicken breed is well-suited for them.

2. Train Your Chicken Pet

You can choose to train your chicken, just like you would a puppy, with treats or a clicker to always use the litter box. To achieve this, put the chicken pet in a litter box when you notice she’s about to release waste and reward her with a treat afterward. That way, the chicken will begin to associate using the little box (good behavior) with getting treats.

After the chicken pet gets familiar with using the litter box, you can switch from using treats to using a clicker. The chicken will instinctively go to the litter box when she hears the clicker sound.

Some people prefer to clean up the feces as the chicken excretes them. Doing this is not very convenient, and there’s no guarantee you won’t miss some poop in some corners.

Caring For your Indoor Pet Chicken

house chicken

Once your chicken is inside, you’ve got to start caring for her immediately.

Hygiene: Ensure you clean the chicken’s environment regularly and adequately.

Clean and Fresh Water: Maintain a constant supply of fresh drinking water for your new pet. You can buy specially-made drinkers that prevent the chickens from falling into and drowning in them.

Good Feed: Provide a pelleted diet for your pet chicken. Fresh feed is essential for the growth and health of a chicken. Also, supplement her diet with apple cider vinegar (ACV).

Apart from ACV, you can add other supplements such as crushed garlic, fresh greens, probiotics, and protein-rich ingredients.

Bonding with your Pet Chicken

Bonding with your pet chicken is what makes her a pet in the first place. You have to observe your chicken daily to get to know her behavior and temperament. Doing this will also help you monitor the chicken’s health.

I talk to my pet chicken and call her by her name every time. I also enjoy mimicking her coos, clucks, and warbles because doing so helps me get closer to her.

Just like every other pet, show your pet chicken loads of affection. Make it a habit to gently rub the back of her neck, as every chicken loves that. When you’re not too busy, take out time to play with her.

Give the Chicken Some Outdoor Time

Chickens love being outdoors, and your indoor pet chicken is no different. So, make room for your chicken to take a walk outside daily. Besides, sunlight helps with egg production.

Conclusion

Raising a pet chicken is not only feasible but fulfilling. Like we’ve discussed so far, all you’ve got to do is put the necessary arrangements in place, and you are on your way to grooming a lovely family chicken.

Now, are you ready to raise a pet chicken?

  • Plan for where the chicken will stay
  • Have a ‘poop plan.’
  • Be prepared to care for your chicken, and
  • Be ready to bond with your pet chicken.

Feel free to drop any questions you might have in the comments box below. I’m happy to help.

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